Blood and Other Stuff

I was called in to work a shift at the detention centre on Sunday. We had no plans, except for a visit to the gym and some movies on this drizzly day, so I agreed.

Great chance to catch up on CNN (we do not have TV) and dive into the Game of Thrones. I’ve watched the series, but never read the books.

I was called in to work a shift at the detention centre on Sunday. We had no plans, except for a visit to the gym and some movies on this drizzly day, so I agreed.

Great chance to catch up on CNN (we do not have TV) and dive into the Game of Thrones. I’ve watched the series, but never read the books.

It was quiet until an obviously inebriated detainee was brought in. I spent the evening listening to his demands, pleas of innocence, and brewing him herbal tea to help settle his stomach.

He was very, very drunk. Apparently, having a reading of over 400 on the standard breathalyzer scale has been observed. A reading of .08 is considered intoxicated.

Today’s difficult insisted on being taken to the local clinic for stomach pains and vomiting.

I tried to convince him to lie down, drink water and wait for the alcohol wore off. He managed to remove some on his arm from a knife wound spewed blood all over the cell.

“I’m bleeding, help me!” he called, as he passed bloody sheets and pillows through his slot, which I made a point of not touching. I gave him some fresh towels to bandage up his open wounds.

“Do you have any bobby pins?” he asked me. I realized then that he had been removing his stitches himself and wanted to have a better tool. His retching and vomiting worsened.

He had a history with the centre and the constables who didn’t seem impressed until he claimed to be vomiting blood. What to expect of spending two weeks drinking 24% proof alcohol … The herbal tea had given him had a red tinge, but to be safe, he was brought to the clinic. He was soon sent back to the detention centre when she found him sticking his fingers down his throat.

As for those who have asked about a previous post about “Jack,” we almost had a good day. I took him to the library as a reward. I turned my back for a moment and had a magazine winged at me.

At least is was not a hard covered book. That woulda hurt!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Blood and Other Stuff

  1. Alcohol, abuse and violence are huge problems in isolated northern communities. Tumultuous home lives affect families and the children I see everyday at school. This is a reality as much as the beauty of the landscapes and spontaneity of the children, flying kites on the beach, the feasts and warmth of the people who live here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s