Flying Kites on the Beach

IMG_00000463 copyThe traditional end of school picnic was held at the inuksuk. It was cold, but otherwise a beautiful day. Not too many words today, just a couple of pictures.

Hot dog lunch

Hot dog lunch

Boys and their dog

Boys and their dog

Making s'mores in a solar oven

Making s’mores in a solar oven

Flying Kites

Flying Kites

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Inuksuk – Little Men of Stone

 

Photographed at Pacific Rim Park

Photographed at Pacific Rim Park

Like many suburban gardeners, I’ve always been fascinated by inuksuks, the traditional Inuit statues, stones jutting out at the sides vaguely representing a human form.

Last night, we mentioned that we would be moving up to Whapmagoostui and the neighbouring Inuit community of Kuujjuarapik. After discussing how cold it is up there, someone at the table mentioned that we’d be seeing inuksuks. I’ve always been curious what they signified.

From what we gathered from last night’s conversation, there are two kinds. The traditional ones, with flailing arms are actually human representations used to herd caribou for hunters. The caribou mistake the stone towers for humans and follow the path designed for them.

Other stone piles are markers. Bending down and looking through an opening, the next structure can be seen. This is clearly a direction marker.

When I have a garden again one day, I will build an Inuksuk, but this time I will understand its significance.